The Flying Fish

Brace yourself for a more controlled roller coaster ride, the beat, the choreography, is spectacular.

Sayginer loves color. He loves them. More than he would even care for the sketch that binds or defines those colors in. The creator Murat Sayginer beautifies the purity of the elements in the nature with vivid metaphors expressing the ins and outs of the living and the dead. And his world is balanced by focusing on the other side of the realm. As much as beautiful these scenarios are, the clear abhorrence is communicated through materialistic possessions that we crave over the natural bodies. This post-internet world fits right in. Sayginer insists on contrasting these things to their exaggerated levels, in order to mark a better and powerful impact.

But what I personally love about the film is that if you are slow like me, the abstract storytelling doesn’t come off as hindrance. It is an experience. And Sayginer clearly has worked hard on that, covering content like mortality, immortality, The Golden Age, Kaleidoscopic images, Zodiac signs and many other themes, the film flows following The Flying Fish whose presence isn’t always mentioned.

I felt that this behavior that acts or works as a perspective returning back to the world it comes from is how the film settles a major debate. Debate being, how and where this is going. And I imagine how difficult it might be to end on a note, after literally visiting different ages that passed by. I can promise you that the end is not only an eye opener and a mind clearer but also is thoroughly satisfying. Another thing to mention in here is how smooth and effective the background score is, along with the visual effects that serves the purpose to its fullest, almost like the elements of the universe depicted in the film.

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